Shalak M.E.

LESSER NOGAI HORDE RELATIONSHIP BUILDING WITH THE CRIMEAN KHANATE IN THE FIRST YEARS OF THE HORDE EXISTENCE

Abstract:

Today in historiography there is an opinion that the Lesser Nogai Horde, or Kaziev ulus, was in vassal dependence from the Crimean Khanate almost immediately since the time of its foundation in the steppe Ciscaucasia in the middle of the 16th century. But was it really so? The purpose of this article is to trace the process of relationship building between the Lesser Nogai Horde and the Crimean Khanate in the first decade of the Kaziev ulus (1551–1562). This can be done through a thorough analysis of historical sources that reflect the relations. As a result of the work done, it was concluded that the Lesser Nogais were gradually included in the orbit of allies of the Crimean Khanate in the North Caucasus. Further on, beyond the chronological framework of our study, the increasing dependence of the Lesser Nogais on the Crimea will be directly related to their military and political weakening as well as the strengthening of the position of the Moscow state in the region. It was the protection from Moscow that forced the kazyevs to seek help and support from the Crimean Khans. Eventually, by the end of the 1630s the Lesser Nogai Horde ceased to exist as a political entity, and the majority of its mirzas with their people moved to the territory of the Crimean Khanate. Due to the lack of documentation reflecting the actual Crimean-Nogai relations, we will mainly analyse those sources on Russian-Nogai and Russian-Crimean relations that were included in the Embassy books on Russia's rela-tions with the Nogai Horde and the Crimean Khanate

About the autors:

Maxim Evgen'evich Shalak, Candidate of Historical Sciences, Associate Professor at the Department of Special Historical Disciplines and Documentary Studies, Institute of History and International Relations

Place of employment:

Southern Federal University

Contacts:

e-mail: shemjchich@mail.ru

Key words:

Lesser Nogai Horde; Crimean Khanate; Embassy books; steppe Ciscaucasia