Tsys’ V.V.

WORK OF RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH AND SECULAR AUTHORITY ON THE ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOLS FOR INDIGENOUS POPULATION OF TOBOLSK NORTH IN 1830–50s

Abstract:

The purpose of the article is to study plans for the organization of school education for children of the indigenous population in the Tobolsk North in the epoch of Nicholas I, as well as the problems arising in the implementation of these plans. It has been noted that the interaction of spiritual and secular authorities played an important role in the dissemination of education in the region. It is pointed out that in school construction, there existed objective contradictions between secular authorities of various levels, as well as between the clergy and civilian officials in general. It is emphasized that the main executors of plans to create educational institutions for “inorodtsy” were church clergy and monks. The schools were organized and began their work mainly in the middle  second half of the 1840s. It is concluded that the reasons for the failure of the first attempts to create such educational institutions were as follows: lack of funding and trained teachers as well as the content of school syllabus that was not related to the daily needs of local population. Attention is drawn to the fact that some part of the clergy and officials were aware of possible ways for successful dissemination of education in the Tobolsk North, i.e. teaching in their native language, introducing practice-oriented disciplines into the syllabus, etc. Moreover, sedentarisation of nomadic and semi-nomadic population was pointed out as a necessary prerequisite for these plans. However, there were no relevant conditions for the implementation of such intentions at that time

About the autors:

Valery Valentinovich Tsys’, Doctor of Historical Sciences, Professor at the Department of Russian History

Place of employment:

Nizhnevartovsk State University

Contacts:

e-mail: roshist@mail.ru

Key words:

Tobolsk North; Russian Orthodox Church; Nickolas I; clergy; the Ostyaks; education and awareness; missionary work; school construction